Monthly Archives: October 2015

13 MANNERS to review with our kids!

 13 MANNERS to review with our kids! A refresher never hurts anyone! Parents  we need reminders too.

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1. Say "please" and "thank you." The two benchmarks of good manners, but sadly lacking today, despite the fact that teaching kids to say them is a simple process of reminding them.

2. Make eye contact. Personal interaction requires some level of engagement, and unless there are special circumstances, eye contact is the bare minimum.images-9

3. Chew with their mouths closed. Nobody likes the site of chewed up food, and open mouths increase the chance of things falling out.

4. Don't interrupt. Unless it's an emergency (it usually isn't), kids need to learn patience and allow an interaction to continue.

5. Don't text at the table. Seemingly a no-brainer, I am constantly astounded by how much kids (and adults) check their phones during meals. I'm guilty, but trying not to do it!

6. Don't text during conversations. Nothing relays the message that you've got better things to do than checking your phone during a conversation.

7. Honor Privacy You don't have to read someone's diary to invade her privacy. In a world of reality TV and 24/7 social media, it's challenging to maintain a sense of privacy. 

  • Knock on the door before entering a room.

  • Do not eavesdrop on others' conversations.

  • Don't spread gossip and rumors.

  • Don't share and forward the personal information (or photos) of others.

  • Do put an end to forwards that land in your lap. It stops here.

8. Learn to say "excuse me." Always appropriate when interrupting a situation or when releasing "gas."

9. Have integrity  "Honesty and integrity are at the very foundation of one's character," says Sena. Our children must learn how powerful their words are, and how using them wisely is at the core of good manners.

  • Tell the truth. "It's not always easier to tell the truth, but it's always better in the long run," says Nickell. "Our children should know that lying won't get them anywhere, and that honesty really is the best policy."

  • Stick to your word. "Teach the importance of following through and living by your word," says Nickell. "It's an essential part of life, and it's a lesson children can begin to learn at a young age." If you say you're going to do something, stick to it.

10.Respect your elders "Speak to adults respectfully and look them in the eye when they are speaking to you," says Liz Taylor, an etiquette consultant in Minneapolis. Refer to them as Mr. or Mrs. unless they tell you otherwise. (If you don't know their names, refer to them as sir or ma'am.) Politely offer them your seat or let them go before you (through a door, in a buffet line, or anywhere).

11. Lose gracefully. If you do your best, then it doesn't matter whether you win or lose. We can't win every game, so when you lose, be sure to thank your opponent, shake hands and say, "Well done!" or "Good job." No sore losers, please.Unknown-8

  • Maintain a positive attitude. Sports and games should emphasize building each other up, taking turns, playing as a team, working hard and striving to improve. By focusing on these positives, there will be fewer bad manners when there is a loss.

12. Acknowledge friends and acquaintances. A simple nod or smile is all it takes, versus ignoring them completely.

13. Eat your food,with mouth closed, just another reminder!

 
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